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Deborah Allen

Deborah Allen is on leave from the University of Delaware to serve in the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education, where she is a Program Director for the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship program, and for the Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological & Mathematical Sciences (UBM), Course, Curriculum & Laboratory Improvement (CCLI), Research Coordination Networks–Undergraduate Biology Education (RCN-UBE), and Scholarships in Science Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) programs. Before joining DUE, Allen served as PI of a NSF-funded Teacher Professional Continuum project, and continues to collaborate with the project's team of science and science education faculty who study pre-service teachers' progress through a reform-based teacher preparation program, and who co-teach courses for students in that program. Allen serves on the editorial board of CBE-Life Sciences Education and has co-authored a regularly-featured column on teaching strategies for that journal. She is the author of Transformations: Approaches to College Science Teaching (W.H. Freeman's Scientific Teaching Series, 2009).


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American Chemical Society-ACS

The American Chemical Society (ACS) is a congressionally chartered independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry. Chemistry in the Community (ChemCom) is the result of an National Science Foundation (NSF) grant with the goal of improving chemical literacy among all high school students taking chemistry. 

ACS URL:  http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/resources/highschool/chemcom.html


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Peter Atkins

Peter Atkins is a fellow of Lincoln College in the University of Oxford and the author of about 70 books for students and a general audience. His texts are market leaders around the globe. A frequent lecturer in the United States and throughout the world, he has held visiting professor­ships in France, Israel, Japan, China, and New Zealand. He was the founding chairman of the Committee on Chemistry Education of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry and was a member of IUPAC’s Physical and Biophysical Chemistry Division.


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Janelle M. Bailey

Janelle M. Bailey, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Science Education in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.  Her research interests include identifying and measuring change in students' knowledge about astronomy topics, the teaching and learning of science, and the effectiveness of professional development for science teachers.  She teaches courses in science education, including methods and research courses, for both undergraduate and graduate students.  She is the past Chair of the American Association of Physics Teachers' Space Science and Astronomy Committee.  Dr. Bailey earned her B.A. in Astrophysics from Agnes Scott College and her M.Ed. in Science Education from the University of Georgia.  Her Ph.D. is from the University of Arizona's Department of Teaching and Teacher Education, where she studied undergraduates' conceptual understanding of stars and star properties.


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Colin Baird

Colin Baird is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Western Ontario.   He has received the University's Edward G. Pleva Teaching Award and a national 3M Teaching Fellowship Award.


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Tadhg P. Begley

Tadhg P. Begley received his B.Sc. from National University of Ireland and his Ph.D. at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Begley is the recipient of many awards, including the Merck Faculty Development Award and the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award. His research group uses the principles and techniques of organic chemistry to study complex organic transformations found in vitamin biosynthetic pathways. In addition to The Organic Chemistry of Biological Pathways, Dr. Begley has edited Cofactor Biosynthesis: A Mechanistic Perspective.


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Jeremy M. Berg

JEREMY M. BERG received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Chemistry from Stanford (where he did research with Keith Hodgson and Lubert Stryer) and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Harvard with Richard Holm. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship with Carl Pabo in Biophysics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Johns Hopkins from 1986 to 1990. He then moved to Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as Professor and Director of the Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, where he remained until 2003. He then became Director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. In 2011, he moved to the University of Pittsburgh where he is now Professor of Computational and Systems Biology and Pittsburgh Foundation Chair and Director of the Institute for Personalized Medicine. He served as President of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from 2011-2013. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He received the American Chemical Society Award in Pure Chemistry (1994) and the Eli Lilly Award for Fundamental Research in Biological Chemistry (1995), was named Maryland Outstanding Young Scientist of the Year (1995), received the Harrison Howe Award (1997), and received public service awards from the Biophysical Society, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the American Chemical Society, and the American Society for Cell Biology. He also received numerous teaching awards, including the W. Barry Wood Teaching Award (selected by medical students), the Graduate Student Teaching Award, and the Professor’s Teaching Award for the Preclinical Sciences. He is coauthor, with Stephen J. Lippard, of the textbook Principles of Bioinorganic Chemistry.


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Michael M. Cox

Michael M. Cox was born in Wilmington, Delaware. After graduating from the University of Delaware in 1974, Cox went to Brandeis University to do his doctoral work with William P. Jencks, and then to Stanford in 1979 for postdoctoral study with I. Robert Lehman. He moved to the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1983, and became a full professor of biochemistry in 1992. His research focuses on recombinational DNA repair processes. In addition to the work on this text, Cox is a co-author of four editions of Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry. He has received awards for both his teaching and his research, including the 1989 Eli Lilly Award in Biological Chemistry, and two major teaching awards from the University of Wisconsin and the University of Wisconsin System. Hobbies include travel, gardening, wine collecting, and assisting in the design of laboratory buildings.


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Clarissa Dirks

Clarissa Dirks is an Associate Professor of Biology at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. She earned her PhD in Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University of Washington, conducting research in virology at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. She currently investigates the evolution of viruses and host viral-inhibitory proteins, as well as the distribution and biodiversity of Tardigrada species. As a Biology Education Researcher, she has implemented programs to improve retention of underrepresented students in first year science courses, conducted studies to better understand how students acquire and master science process and reasoning skills, and is developing assessment instruments to measure undergraduates' science process skill acquisitions. She has received two Tom Rye Harvill Awards for the Integration of Art and Science, has been named a National Academies Education Fellow and Mentor in the Life Sciences, and is the recipient of two Biology Leadership Education grants. She works to provide professional development opportunities for faculty and post-doctoral scholars by serving on the National Academies Summer Institute for Undergraduate Science Education Committee, leading a Pacific Northwest Regional Summer Institute, and mentoring post-doctoral fellows as a regional field station leader for the Faculty Institute for Reforming Science Teaching. As a member of the National Research Council's Board on Life Sciences committee on Developing a Framework for an International Faculty Development Project on Education about Research in the Life Sciences with Dual Use Potential, she trains faculty in best practices for teaching responsible conduct of research in their countries. She is a member of the Editorial Board of the journal CBE-Life Science Education and a co-founder of the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER).


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Displaying 1-15 of 61