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Janelle M. Bailey

Janelle M. Bailey, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Science Education in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.  Her research interests include identifying and measuring change in students' knowledge about astronomy topics, the teaching and learning of science, and the effectiveness of professional development for science teachers.  She teaches courses in science education, including methods and research courses, for both undergraduate and graduate students.  She is the past Chair of the American Association of Physics Teachers' Space Science and Astronomy Committee.  Dr. Bailey earned her B.A. in Astrophysics from Agnes Scott College and her M.Ed. in Science Education from the University of Georgia.  Her Ph.D. is from the University of Arizona's Department of Teaching and Teacher Education, where she studied undergraduates' conceptual understanding of stars and star properties.


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Clarissa Dirks

Clarissa Dirks is an Associate Professor of Biology at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. She earned her PhD in Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University of Washington, conducting research in virology at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. She currently investigates the evolution of viruses and host viral-inhibitory proteins, as well as the distribution and biodiversity of Tardigrada species. As a Biology Education Researcher, she has implemented programs to improve retention of underrepresented students in first year science courses, conducted studies to better understand how students acquire and master science process and reasoning skills, and is developing assessment instruments to measure undergraduates' science process skill acquisitions. She has received two Tom Rye Harvill Awards for the Integration of Art and Science, has been named a National Academies Education Fellow and Mentor in the Life Sciences, and is the recipient of two Biology Leadership Education grants. She works to provide professional development opportunities for faculty and post-doctoral scholars by serving on the National Academies Summer Institute for Undergraduate Science Education Committee, leading a Pacific Northwest Regional Summer Institute, and mentoring post-doctoral fellows as a regional field station leader for the Faculty Institute for Reforming Science Teaching. As a member of the National Research Council's Board on Life Sciences committee on Developing a Framework for an International Faculty Development Project on Education about Research in the Life Sciences with Dual Use Potential, she trains faculty in best practices for teaching responsible conduct of research in their countries. She is a member of the Editorial Board of the journal CBE-Life Science Education and a co-founder of the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER).


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Roger Freedman

Dr. Roger A. Freedman is a Lecturer in Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

He was an undergraduate at the University of California campuses in San Diego and Los Angeles, and did his doctoral research in theoretical nuclear physics at Stanford University. He came to UCSB in 1981 after three years of teaching and doing research at the University of Washington. At UCSB, Dr. Freedman has taught in both the Department of Physics and the College of Creative Studies, a branch of the university intended for highly gifted and motivated undergraduates. In recent years, he has helped to develop computer-based tools for learning introductory physics and astronomy and has been a pioneer in the use of classroom response systems and the “flipped” classroom model at UCSB. Roger holds a commercial pilot’s license and was an early organizer of the San Diego Comic-Con, now the world’s largest popular culture convention.


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Gary Gladding

Professor Gary Gladding, a high energy experimentalist, joined the Department of Physics at Illinois as a research associate after receiving his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1971.  He became assistant professor in 1973 and has, since 1985, been a full professor. He has done experiments at CERN, Fermilab, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, and the Cornell Electron Storage Ring.  He served as Associate Head for Undergraduate Programs for thirteen years. He was named a Fellow of the American Physical Society for his contributions to the improvement of large enrollment introductory physics courses. Since 1996, Professor Gladding has led the faculty group responsible for the success of the massive curriculum revision that has transformed the introductory physics curriculum here at Illinois. This effort has involved more than 50 faculty and improved physics instruction for more than 25,000 science and engineering undergraduate students. He has shifted his research focus over the last ten years to physics education research (PER) and currently leads the PER group. He is also heavily involved in preparing at-risk students for success in physics coursework through the development of Physics 100. Professor Gladding was also a key player in the creation and development of i>clicker™.


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Joseph W. Goodman

Joseph W. Goodman held the William Ayer Chair in Electrical Engineering at Stanford, and also served in several administrative posts, including Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering, and Senior Associate Dean of Engineering for Faculty Affairs. He is now the William Ayer Professor Emeritus. His work has been recognized by a variety of awards and honors, including the F.E. Terman Award of the American Society for Engineering Education, the Dennis Gabor Award of the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE), the Max Born Award, the Esther Beller Hoffman Award, the Ives Medal from the Optical Society of America, and the Education Medal of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served as president of the Optical Society of America and the International Commission for Optics.


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Kathleen Green

Kathleen Green is an Associate Professor of English at Pasadena City College in Pasadena, California, where she has taught integrated reading and writing courses since 2001. She earned her Ph.D. in English at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and served as Assistant Professor of English at Purdue University-Calumet before moving to California. She has taught a wide variety of courses--including film history, film theory, women's literature, African-American literature, and children's literature--as well as the entire range of English composition courses, from basic skills to developmental to advanced composition. She has published scholarly articles on women's history and popular culture, but prefers working with students just beginning their journeys into higher education. She has served as a faculty tutor in the Pasadena City College Writing Center, has been involved with Writing Across the Curriculum, and has developed online curricula to help students with basic writing and reading skills across many disciplines. Currently, she teaches in the Veterans Learning Collaborative at PCC, a cohort-based program that helps U.S. military veterans make the transition to college learning.


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Philip R. Kesten

Dr. Philip Kesten, Associate Professor of Physics and Associate Provost for Residential Learning Communities at Santa Clara University, holds a B.S. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and received his Ph.D. in high energy particle physics from the University of Michigan. Since joining the Santa Clara faculty in 1990, Dr. Kesten has also served as Chair of Physics, Faculty Director of the ATOM and da Vinci Residential Learning Communities, and Director of the Ricard Memorial Observatory. He has received awards for teaching excellence and curriculum innovation, was Santa Clara's Faculty Development Professor for 2004-2005, and was named the California Professor of the Year in 2005 by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Education. Dr. Kesten is co-founder of Docutek, (A SirsiDynix Company), an Internet software company, and has served as the Senior Editor for Modern Dad, a newsstand magazine.


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Amy Lawlor

Amy Lawlor is a Professor of English at City College of San Francisco where she has been teaching integrated reading/writing and creative writing since 2008. She earned her M.A. in English as well as a Composition Certificate from San Francisco State University and a Post-Secondary Reading Certificate from Cal State Fullerton.  In the 15 years that she has been teaching college, she has enjoyed working at a number of Bay Area community colleges as well as Pasadena City College where she was exposed to a wide variety of composition curricula and experience teaching integrated reading/writing, reading, composition, Filipino-American literature, Latino-American literature, and other courses, including learning community courses and writing-across-the-curriculum courses. At Pasadena City College, in addition to teaching composition and literature, she worked as a faculty tutor in the Pasadena City College Writing Center and collaborated with Kathy Green in developing online curricula for reading and writing. She is currently co-lead faculty for one of City College of San Francisco’s accelerated courses and calls curriculum and faculty development her primary professional interests outside the classroom.


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Philip Nelson

Philip Nelson is Professor of Physics at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his A.B. from Princeton University (1980) and Ph.D. from Harvard University (1984). Dr. Nelson serves on the Biophysical Society’s Education Committee; he received Penn’s highest teaching award in 2001, in part for creating the course that formed the basis for this book. Dr. Nelson was recently elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society.


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Todd Ruskell

As a Teaching Professor of Physics at the Colorado School of Mines, Todd G. Ruskell focuses on teaching at the introductory level, and continually develops more effective ways to help students learn. One method used in large enrollment introductory courses is Studio Physics. This collaborative, hands-on environment helps students develop better intuition about, and conceptual models of, physical phenomena through an active learning approach. Dr. Ruskell brings his experience in improving students’ conceptual understanding to the text, as well as a strong liberal arts perspective. Dr. Ruskell’s love of physics began with a B.A. in physics from Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin. He went on to receive an M.S. and Ph.D. in optical sciences from the University of Arizona. He has received awards for teaching excellence, including Colorado School of Mines’ Alumni Teaching Award. Dr. Ruskell currently serves on the physics panel and advisory board for the NANSLO (North American Network of Science Labs Online) project.


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Displaying 1-15 of 25