Thinking Through Sources for American Histories, Volume 1
Second Edition   ©2017

Thinking Through Sources for American Histories, Volume 1

Nancy A. Hewitt (Rutgers University) , Steven F. Lawson (Rutgers University)

  • ISBN-10: 1-319-04237-6; ISBN-13: 978-1-319-04237-0; Format: Paper Text, 160 pages

  • Podcast

    Nancy Hewitt and Steven Lawson talk about Incorporating Primary Sources into their Text

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Please Note: Volume 1 includes Chapters 1-14 and Volume 2 includes Chapters 14-29.

CONTENTS
Preface
Guide to Analyzing Primary Sources
DOCUMENT PROJECT 1 Mapping America
1.1 Christopher and Bartolomeo Columbus, Map of Europe
and North Africa
(c. 1490)
1.2 Piri Reis Map (1513)
1.3 Dauphin Map of Canada (c. 1543)
1.4 Map of Cuauhtinchan (1550)
Interpret the Evidence
Put It in Context

Document Project 2 Comparing Virginia and Massachusetts Bay Colonies
2.1 John Smith, The Commodities in Virginia (c. 1612)
2.2 Powhatan’s Viewpoint, as Reported by John Smith (1608)
2.3 John Winthrop, A Model of Christian Charity (1630)
2.4 Richard Frethorne, Letter Home from Virginia (1623)
2.5 Letter Home from Massachusetts Bay (1631)
Interpret the Evidence
Put It in Context

DOCUMENT PROJECT 3 The Atlantic Slave Trade
3.1 Venture Smith, A Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Venture, a Native of Africa (1798)
3.2 Thomas Phillips, Voyage of the Hannibal (1694)
3.3 Willem Bosman, A New and Accurate Description of the Coast of Guinea (1703)
3.4 Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano (1789)
Interpret the Evidence
Put It in Context
DOCUMENT PROJECT 4 A New Commercial Culture in Boston
4.1 Ship Arrivals and Departures at Boston (1707)
4.2 Goods for Sale (1720)
4.3 Advertisement for Musical Instruments (1716)
4.4 Chest of Drawers (c. 1735–1739)
4.5 Advertisement for Runaway Slave (1744)
4.6 Letter from a Boston Protester (1737)
Interpret the Evidence
Put It in Context

DOCUMENT PROJECT 5 Defining Liberty, Defining America
5.1 The Albany Plan of Union (1754)
5.2 Boycott Agreement of Women in Boston (1770)
5.3 Peter Bestes and Massachusetts Slaves, Letter to Local Representatives (1773)
5.4 Committees of Correspondence (1773)
5.5 J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur, Letters from an American Farmer (1782)
Interpret the Evidence
Put It in Context

DOCUMENT PROJECT 6 Loyalists in the American Revolution
6.1 Joseph Galloway, Speech to Continental Congress (1774)
6.2 Charles Inglis, The True Interest of America Impartially Stated (1776)
6.3 Hannah Griffits, Response to Thomas Paine (1777)
6.4 Joseph Brant (Mohawk) Expresses Loyalty to the Crown (1776)
6.5 Boston King, Memoirs of the Life of Boston King (1798)
Interpret the Evidence
Put It in Context

Document Project 7 The Whiskey Rebellion
7.1 Resolution to the Pennsylvania Legislature (1791)
7.2 The Pittsburgh Resolution (1794)
7.3 George Washington, Proclamation against the Rebels (1794)
7.4 Alexander Hamilton, Letter to George Washington (August 5, 1794)
7.5 James Madison, Letter to James Monroe (December 4, 1794)
Interpret the Evidence
Put It in Context

Document Project 8 Race Relations in the Early Republic
8.1 Confession of Solomon (September 1800)
8.2 Andrew Jackson, Runaway Slave Advertisement (1804)
8.3 Robert Sutcliff, Travels in Some Parts of North America (1812)
8.4 Free Blacks in Philadelphia Oppose Colonization (1817)
8.5 Richard Allen, Excerpt from The Life, Experience, and Gospel Labours of the Rt. Rev. Richard Allen (1833)
Interpret the Evidence
Put It in Context

Document Project 9 The Panic of 1819
9.1 Auction in Chatham Square (1820)
9.2 James Flint, Account of the Panic (1820)
9.3 Virginia Agricultural Society, Antitariff Petition (1820)
9.4 James Kent, Arguments against Expanding Male Voting Rights (1821)
9.5 Nathan Sanford, Arguments for Expanding Male Voting Rights (1821)
Interpret the Evidence
Put It in Context

Document Project 10 The Cherokee Removal
10.1 Andrew Jackson, Second Annual Message (1830)
10.2 Petition of the Women’s Councils to the Cherokee National Council (1831)
10.3 John Marshall, Majority Opinion, Cherokee Nation v. Georgia (1831)
10.4 Andrew Jackson as the Great Father (c. 1835)
10.5 John Ross, On the Treaty of New Echota (1836)
Interpret the Evidence
Put It in Context

Document Project 11 Debating Abolition
11.1 William Lloyd Garrison, On the Constitution and the Union (1832)
11.2 Angelina Grimké, Appeal to the Christian Women of the South (1836)
11.3 Stephen Symonds Foster, The Brotherhood of Thieves (1843)
11.4 Liberty Party Platform (1844)
11.5 Frederick Douglass, Abolitionism and the Constitution (1851)
Interpret the Evidence
Put It in Context

Document Project 12 Sectional Politics and the Rise of the Republican Party
12.1 Abraham Lincoln, On Slavery (1854)
12.2 Republican Party Platform (1856)
12.3 Charles Sumner, The Crime against Kansas (1856)
12.4 Lydia Maria Child, Letters to Mrs. S. B. Shaw and Miss Lucy Osgood (1856)
12.5 The Lincoln-Douglas Debates (1858)
Interpret the Evidence
Put It in Context

Document Project 13 Home-Front Protest during the Civil War
13.1 John Beauchamp Jones, The Richmond Bread Riot (1866)
13.2 Testimony of New York City Draft Riot Victim Mrs. Statts, Collected by the Committee of Merchants for the Relief of Colored People, Suffering from the Late Riots (1863)
13.3 Clement L. Vallandigham, The Civil War in America (1863)
13.4 Calls for Peace in North Carolina (1863)
13.5 Ella Gertrude Clanton Thomas, Diary (1864)
Interpret the Evidence
Put It in Context

Document Project 14 Reconstruction in South Carolina
14.1 Colored People’s Convention of South Carolina, Memorial to Congress (1865)
14.2 Lottie Rollin, Address on Universal Suffrage (1870)
14.3 Robert Brown Elliott, In Defense of the Civil Rights Bill (1874)
14.4 James Shepherd Pike, The Prostrate State (1874)
14.5 Ulysses S. Grant, Letter to South Carolina Governor D. H. Chamberlain (1876)
Interpret the Evidence
Put It in Context

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